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Food Prices-Higher or Not?

September 19th, 2007 at 02:15 pm

I'm trying to rethink our food budget again, in light of the freezer's arrival and our upcoming lower income. So I went online to find the latest USDA Food Plan as a guide.

It got me thinking--they keep saying inflation is well under control, but I'm definitely noticing higher prices on certain foods. I haven't been keeping good spending records lately, so am I just imagining it?

The CPI figures that just came out say food is up 4.2% on an annual basis (August to August). www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm

I compared the USDA food plans for last June and this June (June is supposed to represent an average figure for the year.) Their food budgets have gone up 5.9% in a year.

And here's an article that says:

"According to figures from the United States Department of Agriculture, the price of foods containing high amounts of protein have increased the most. The cost of beef has increased by 6.4 percent. Poultry is up 7.8 percent.

"But both are trumped by milk, which costs 9.5 percent more than it did at the beginning of the year.

"For the year, the USDA is forecasting a food inflation rate of 4 to 4.5 percent, with the highest increases being seen in dairy and eggs. Historically, retail food prices inflate at a rate of 2.5 percent. “Very rarely do we get above 3.5 percent,” said Leibtag. But even if prices fall some this autumn, it appears this year's inflation rate will be the highest since 1990."

www.freshplaza.com/news_detail.asp?id=6647

It really makes you wonder what to think.

6 Responses to “Food Prices-Higher or Not?”

  1. fern Says:

    Yes, prices are definitely up in every food category becus with the rise in oil prices, it is more expensive to ship food to distribution points all across the country.

  2. Aleta Says:

    Yes, they are higher. I notice it even in cans of vegetables. The sale prices don't seem like sale prices anymore. They look like the old prices.

  3. mbkonef Says:

    Sometimes prices don't seem higher because manufacturers instead downsize the box, jar etc. You think you are still paying the same price for the item but you are actually paying a higher price because you are getting less of the item. They may make the bag the same size, just put less in it, put fewer individual servings in a larger package etc. As long as the actual weight, size etc. is listed on the package they can get away with this. It really annoys me cause it feels like they are trying to get away with something sneaky. I am noticing it right now with starting to buy candy for Halloween. Not only do the "fun" sizes of most candies seem to have gotten slightly smaller, the packages hold fewer.

  4. nance Says:

    Supposedly, part of the reason beef and dairy products are higher, is because the price of corn to feed cattle has gone up a lot due to farmers getting a better price for corn to be used for ethanol.
    It's good for the corn growers, but not necessarily for the consumer.
    I could not believe the price of powdered milk, when I purchased a box last weekend. At Sam's, a 22 quart size box was nearly $15.00! I use it in cooking, and for hot chocolate, but I don't think I am saving much.

  5. baselle Says:

    You are not imagining it. I'm seeing it in my price book. I've just about given up finding fresh produce for under $1/lb. Except for cabbage, which I like but not all the time.

  6. maismom Says:

    I noticed the increase in food prices as well. I used to get a dozen of eggs form Trader Joes for 99 cents. They are $1.19 now. The price of milk also went up, and I pay little over $6 for two gallons of milk which I used to pay under $5. I keep looking for deals to offset the increase.

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